Balancing the Demand Equation: a Twitter Chat with Adam Needles on his new book

There’s a brand new book that’s making waves in the B2B marketing community. Balancing the Demand Equation, by Adam Needles, addresses the strategy and tactics needed to succeed in modern business to business demand gen.

Adam Needles is the Chief Strategy Officer at digital demand generation agency Left Brain DGA, and for our upcoming #B2Bchat, we’re joined by the author as he answers questions related to B2B marketing, demand generation, and his hot new book. Join us this Thursday, October 5 at 5:00 p.m.! To learn more, be sure to follow @abneedles and @b2b_chat.

(Update: Two lucky #B2Bchat participants will receive a free copy of Adam Needles’ new book, Balancing the Demand Equation!)

Here are some of the questions we’ll cover:

Q. How is the role of B2B marketers changing within their organizations?

Q. What are the biggest problems faced by B2B marketers today?

Q. How do you define “demand generation”?

Q. What are the different buyer types?

Q. What do you mean by “demand process integration”?

Q. How can you best market to inactive buyers?

Q. Content marketing… examples of a company that has nailed it?

Q. Which B2B case studies would you recommend?

Q. What are people saying about your new book, Balancing the Demand Equation?

 

“Dear B2B Marketer: Your world is changing, and here’s the field guide that shows you precisely how to adapt.” – Ann Handley (@MarketingProfs and Co-author of Content Rules) on Needles’ new book.

Balancing the Demand Equation is now available on Amazon.com.

 

 

Review of Seth Godin’s Poke the Box

I recently had the pleasure of reading Seth Godin’s latest book, Poke the Box. It’s a nice, light read and something that can be fit into an afternoon visit to your favorite coffee shop.

As with other Seth Godin books that I’ve read, the message first strikes you as self evident. “Of course this makes sense. Who wouldn’t know that?” But Seth has a way of taking the obvious, and using it as a means to teach a lesson.

I’d like to share some of the things that have stuck with me from this book. Incidentally, as I was reading it, Twitter provided a temporary outlet to tell the rest of the world what I was gleaning from the pages. There were a lot of bite-sized pieces of information, perfect for the 140 character limit on Twitter.

The basic premise of the book is that a lot of people are afraid of starting, of experimenting with new ideas, of ‘poking the box’ to see what happens.

“There are two mistakes one can make along the road to truth.
Not going all the way, and not starting.”
Siddhartha Gautama

The Starbucks story provides an example of how it’s ok to start, and be wrong at first. One of the founders, Jerry Baldwin, had a vision of a company that would sell coffee beans and tea leaves. His vision turned out to be wrong, and it was only after his business partner Howard Schultz visited Italy and developed a passion for espresso, that the company took the direction for which it is known today. Jerry Baldwin was wrong, but because he started, it allowed for the company to know it was wrong, then change direction.

The person who fails the most usually wins

Talk to any person who is successful and they will share with you their list of failures that helped bring them to where they are. If you fail only once, i.e. fail big, it’s game over. If you never fail, you’re either very lucky, or you’ve never tried succeeding. It is in allowing yourself multiple smaller failures, and learning from them, that you move forward to successes. Poke the box, figure out which ideas resonate, and then ship them.

Why is this message relevant now?

Today’s market is obsessed with novelty. In a world where information can spread quickly, the most remarkable ideas win.